MultiMedia

Note: This page may take a couple of minutes to load all of the multimedia features depending on your connection speed.

Featured images of ancient art and archaeology from my Flickr photostream:

All images are licensed with Creative Commons for non-commercial use with attribution and the requirement to share any derivatives of these images in the same manner. From my viewpoint, that includes editorial blogs, classroom presentations and projects and personal (non-business) websites.  I often provide images to academic authors as well at little or no cost.  If you are working on a book about ancient history I encourage you to contact me.

The archaeological site of Ostia Antica, was supposedly founded by king Ancus Marcius at the end of the 7th century BCE. Excavations between the mid-19th century and the 1940s have unearthed structures dating to the 4th century BCE although some architectural and pottery fragments date to the 5th century BCE. Traces of early huts have been found as well.





Greek tragedies began to appear in the late 6th century BCE.  The earliest example of Greek comedy we have dates to 486 BCE.  Unlike other aspects of the Greek culture, the Romans only tentatively embraced dramatic theater as older aristocrats feared theater would corrupt the morals of the youth. The first permanent theater, like the one in Ostia, did not appear until the 1st century BCE.  However, as these examples of art and artifacts show, after the 1st century BCE, theater became so popular in the Roman Empire that depictions of theater masks and performers appeared on everyday household items like lamps as well as in wall murals and mosaics that decorated the villas of the wealthy.




Rome and the Ancient World in Film:

I was really disappointed when "Agora" and "Centurion" were not released in any theaters near me. I don't understand it considering the plethora of "hunk-of-the-month" and silly sitcoms taking up such limited screen space! I know they'll be released on DVD but historical epics are worth seeing on the "really big" screen!



My eariler article about Hypatia



More:

The HBO Classic Rome


Ancient Virtual Worlds

Virtual Çatalhöyük in Second Life:



My in depth article about virtual Çatalhöyük at Heritage Key.

A virtual Acropolis in Second Life.



Sadly I've been advised by the creator of this marvelous simulation of the Greek Acropolis that he could no longer afford the maintenance fees. What a cultural loss!

Ancient-Themed Games:




Warning! Not for the Squeamish!



Roman Archaeology Timeline